Tag Archives: Your Health

Back pain – the downside of being upright

In any group of people, asking about back pain will produce nods and frowns. About 80 percent of adults experience low back pain at some point in their life, and it’s the most common cause of job-related disability, a leading contributor to missed work days. About 20 percent of people affected by acute low back pain develop chronic pain.

Back pain is often associated with general degeneration of the spine due to normal wear and tear with aging. The discs begin to lose fluid and flexibility, which decrease their ability to cushion the spine. The likelihood of back pain also increases among people who are not physically fit. An increasing amount of research points to a hereditary component, identified by DNA analysis of families with widespread back pain. Jobs that require heavy lifting, pushing, or pulling have a higher incidence of back pain. At the opposite end of the physical demand spectrum, a desk job may also contribute to back pain, as the sitting position increases the pressure within the lumbar discs. Finally, there is clear evidence that smoking leads to premature degeneration of the lumbar discs, with an increased likelihood of back pain.

Fortunately, surgery is rarely indicated, and there are a multitude of useful nonsurgical treatments, including the application of heat and/or cold and massage. Recommendation for bed rest should be limited, as those who avoid bed rest are more likely to improve faster. Other common treatment methods include over-the-counter medications, physical therapy, and spinal manipulation. More involved but less frequent options can include spinal injections provided in a pain clinic.

Once chronic back pain has developed, the emphasis should be on maximizing symptom management. For those with a desk job, standing and walking frequently during the work day can be very helpful. Ergonomically designed furniture, such as standing desks and lumbar support chairs, may help to reduce symptoms, with particular attention to the most appropriate height for the work surface.

The benefits of a regular exercise program as the most effective tool for management of chronic back pain have been clearly demonstrated. The most important factor is to identify an individual program that works best, and then remain committed to it. This can include walking, swimming, cycling, yoga, low-impact aerobics, and many other regimens.

Affliction of back pain has been noted throughout human history. With our upright posture, the spine bears significant stress regardless of our level of activity. The future of spine care will be best focused on improved means of preventing the degenerative changes that lead to back pain, as well as identification of the most effective and consistent means of diminishing its impact.

TIMOTHY MILLEA, M.D. has practiced as an orthopedic spine surgeon in the Quad Cities area of Iowa and Illinois since 1992. He is an active member of the Catholic Medical Association and serves on the board of directors, as well as being CMA’s state representative for Iowa, and president of the St. Thomas Aquinas Guild of the Quad Cities.

HealthNetwork came to our rescue like no other

There are so many benefits to being a Legatus member. One that I consider a Godsend is Healthnetwork Foundation. Many years ago, Walter and I became Healthnetwork GOLD supporters, as I thought that it would be a great safety net – an organization we could count on when we needed medical help.

It is scary as you get older and see more friends and family struggle with serious health issues, and the overwhelming indecision they face while trying to grasp their new reality. Where do they go for medical care, how do they get there, and whom do they see? All these decisions need to be made in a very short time, while they try and make sense of a diagnosis.

We are so grateful for Healthnetwork. We know from experience they will provide advice on where the right experts are. And, they will quickly jump into securing appointments with experts when we need them.

I had a heart attack a few years ago in Florida, and Walter called Healthnetwork. Without hesitation, Healthnetwork medical coordinators rallied and made connections on our behalf at Cleveland Clinic (#1 heart center as ranked by US News & World Report). Ultimately, I stayed in Florida for treatment, but we were reassured by the swiftness and compassion shared by our coordinator during a very stressful time.

Another time, our daughter, an anesthesiologist, was very concerned about her baby daughter’s soft spot which had not closed. I knew that we needed to get Healthnetwork involved. She asked for more information about the issue and Healthnetwork’s medical director provided research on the condition. They also identified experts who were available to see our granddaughter. She is now a very busy 12-year-old and a champion swimmer.

Walter and I are blessed with good health. Healthnetwork has proven very resourceful in providing physician referrals during the times we needed them most. We have also asked for help for dear friends. One friend had a serious heart issue. Because of Healthnetwork, he was put under the care of Mayo Clinic and lived another seven-plus years.

There are many more stories of families they have helped. Those who call upon Healthnetwork receive an outstanding level of care. Families have the privacy to explore their options. Healthnetwork offers guidance and connections at a very critical time. Because of our gratitude for the life-changing connections we have seen, we have increased our support levels with Healthnetwork.

We encourage other Legates to reach out to Healthnetwork. They are a phenomenal team whose resources are just what is needed when one is faced with stymying medical issues.

WALTER AND JANET KNYSZ are Legates of the Detroit Chapter

Crisis in healthcare – a Catholic perspective on reform

The healthcare crisis in America Today is twofold: ethical and economic.

The ethical crisis is the denial of the sanctity of human life from conception to natural death that has resulted in the abortion of tens of millions of unborn Americans and the physician-mediated deaths of many seriously disabled and terminally ill patients by physician-assisted suicide in the nine jurisdictions where it is legal. 

Additionally, the constitutional right to religious liberty and freedom of conscience is denied those who refuse to comply with federal mandates to provide patients with contraceptive/abortifacient drugs. No proposal for healthcare reform can receive Catholic support if it does not uphold the universal and inalienable right to life and religious liberty.

The economic crisis arises from control of healthcare financing by third parties, (government, insurance industry, unions, and large employers). For the last 50 years this system has insulated patients from the actual costs of care and removed the normal economic incentive to shop based on price and value, thereby contributing to the astronomical rise in costs. Although healthcare outcomes have certainly improved for most people, the rising costs have led to problems of affordability and access for too many Americans. This system is unsustainable. 

Political decisions made over the next 12 – 24 months will likely determine the foreseeable future of healthcare delivery in America. The current national debate focuses on two fundamental proposals: a government controlled, single-payer system vs. a patient-controlled, competitive free-market system.

Those promoting a government-controlled system of healthcare delivery insist upon universal access to contraception and abortion. Based upon experience with the Affordable Care Act, no one would be exempt from compliance with the mandates for care determined by the federal government (i.e., one-payer, one ethic). In contrast, in a patient-oriented, free market system, options would be available to avoid cooperation with evil (room for pro-life ethics).

No government-controlled health care program has proven capable of “bending the cost curve” downward to rein in unsustainable rising costs.

However, evidence from a landmark 1982 RAND study demonstrates that giving patients freedom and choice to control their health care, including financing reduces costs. Also, newer innovations for financing care including health savings accounts, employer-sponsored health reimbursement arrangements, direct primary care, and healthcare sharing ministries, all show promise for lowering costs and increasing access while maintaining high-quality care and enhancing the doctor-patient relationship.

As Catholic lay leaders we have a duty to uphold our faith in our work and in the public square. If we come together to address this crisis in healthcare, and if every Catholic employer offered one or more of the above patient-centered, market-driven innovative options in a faith-based health plan, we would begin the transformation of our healthcare delivery system, defending human dignity and religious liberty while restoring a culture of life in America.

STEVEN WHITE, M.D. has been in the private practice of pulmonary medicine for 35 years. He is a past-president of the Catholic Medical Association and currently serves as chair of the CMA Healthcare Policy Committee.

Bladder, prostate developments more precise

REAL-TIME BLADDER MONITOR

It can be quite burdensome for a person with an overactive bladder or bladder-leakage problem to endure the diagnostic process. He has to come to the clinic, get undressed in an unnatural environment, empty the bladder, get a catheter, refill the bladder with room temp water, urinate… The whole experience causes embarrassment, anxiety, and discomfort for the patient. Furthermore, it’s not a natural situation and really doesn’t allow us to accurately assess what happens in the real world— when the person is exercising, or out running errands.

I’m enthused about the new UroMonitor which we are developing. It’s like a Fitbit for the bladder. It requires a simple insertion, and then we get real-time, real-world data that tells us what is happening in the patient’s bladder. And he doesn’t even have to come to Cleveland Clinic. He can have the monitor inserted locally, then do a virtual consult with an expert here. It has the potential to help tens of millions of people who are affected by bladder issues.

400,000 MEN COULD AVOID BIOPSY

Another thing I’m excited about is a new blood test for prostate cancer screening we’re developing. I have to disclose it’s being formulated by Cleveland Diagnostics, which Cleveland Clinic owns part of, within which I have no personal financial stake.

We know that the current screening for prostate cancer, which has been around for decades, is far from perfect. It results in a large number of false positives, which lead to prostate biopsies. It also leads to over-detection of low-grade cancers that we’d rather not know about because most of them don’t need to be treated.

This new blood test is far better at determining who might have a higher-grade cancer that does need treatment. We have studied this and validated our findings in a second study, and we’re just about to publish our findings in medical journals. It’s very exciting.

There are about 1 million biopsies every year—and this blood test could eliminate the need for 40 percent of them. That’s 400,000 men who won’t need to go through this uncomfortable procedure and its associated risks. Instead we’ll have a much better diagnostic test for every man, not just those who come to Cleveland Clinic.

PHILANTHROPY’S DIFFERENCE

The National Institutes of Health budget has been restricted in recent years. For example, they only fund 8 percent of all cancer research grant requests. In such a restrictive environment, it’s impossible without philanthropic support to do the high-level research that could improve patients’ lives. We must supplement what’s received from government grants, or we simply wouldn’t have enough. A much-needed philanthropic gift we recently received from Healthnetwork and its partners, just opened the scope of what we can do and the number of lives we can affect.

ERIC KLEIN, MD, is chair of the Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute at Cleveland Clinic, one of Healthnetwork’s GOLD hospitals. Dr. Klein was given a Healthnetwork Service Excellence Award for his outstanding patient care. Cleveland Clinic’s urology program is ranked No. 1 in the specialty.

Avert major risk factors for heart attack

You can control your risk of heart attack, the number-one killer of Americans, even if you were dealt a bad genetic hand with a family history of heart attacks, bypass surgery, or coronary stent placement.

A large majority of people who sustain heart attacks before age 40 are smokers. Even a few puffs on a cigarette initiate abnormal changes in the lining of arteries. Continued smoking promotes cholesterol-plaque buildup, plaque instability, and eventually plaque rupture that triggers blood clots. When the clot blocks a coronary (heart muscle) artery, a major heart attack results. Fatal abnormal heart rhythms can occur just seconds after a heart attack begins. If you don’t want a heart attack, don’t smoke!

Study after study has definitively proven that high cholesterol, particularly LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, is highly correlated with coronary artery disease and coronary events. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association provide easy-to-use risk calculators online. Guidelines recommend that if your 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is greater than 7.5 percent, then a cholesterol-lowering medicine called a “statin” should strongly be considered. Statins prevent thousands of heart attacks each year and cause no side effects in 95 percent of patients. A survey at a recent national ACC meeting found that well over half of all cardiologists attending were taking a statin. Maybe they know something? A statin may be right for you.

Diabetes is a major risk factor, and nearly 90% of patients with diabetes are overweight. If every person diagnosed with diabetes lost 15 percent of their body weight, most would no longer even have diabetes. Staying near ideal body weight, along with exercise, will dramatically lower your risk of getting diabetes – and a heart attack.

High blood pressure (>130/80) contributes to heart attack risk. Salt restriction, weight loss if needed, and exercise are the first line of treatment, but most people will still need medicine. Dozens of highly effective meds are affordable – there’s no reason to have high blood pressure in 2019, but sometimes it may take 3 or 4 different medications to achieve that goal.

Next, everybody’s favorite subject – diet. Nutritional guidelines keep changing, but there are certain dietary recommendations for preventing heart disease that are unlikely to change. Minimize red meat, and avoid processed meat. Eat more fatty fish like salmon, but skip fried fish! Eat lots of vegetables. Avoid fast food. Reduce your carbohydrate load to prevent hunger and weight gain. It is really that simple.

Lack of physical activity compromises life. Regular exercise prolongs life, lowers blood pressure, keeps weight in check, increases brain endorphins to bolster mood, and lowers risk of cardiovascular disease for a more productive earthly life to better serve the Lord.

DAVID A. KAMINSKAS practices cardiology in Fort Wayne, Indiana and is the treasurer of the Dr. Jerome Lejeune Catholic Medical Guild of Northeast Indiana.

Cancer-ravaged bone can be ‘tricked’ into regenerating

When I was a student at Yale University School of Medicine in the early 2000s, one of my professor-mentors introduced me to the concept of bone regeneration. I hadn’t known it was possible for the body to heal and regenerate itself to such an extent, and I found it absolutely fascinating!

An idea struck. What if we could tap into the body’s ability to regenerate bone to help cancer patients? It was a novel concept … or so I thought.

High-grade bone cancers used to be a death sentence. If a person was lucky, he would get a limb amputated and live a few more years. Then chemotherapy came along and suddenly 70 percent of younger patients with these aggressive bone cancers were surviving.

Doctors could now treat the cancer with chemo, remove the tumors, and replace the bone defect with metal implants. However, metal things tend to break and wear out. As people got older, they needed multiple surgical interventions to fix or replace the implants. That meant hospital stays, risk of complications, sometimes infection.

Instead of medical implants, what if we could use the body’s natural ability to regenerate bone?I couldn’t wait to tell my mentor.

“It is a great idea,” he said. “But not a new idea.”

Turns out a professor in Japan had been exploring this idea for 25 years already. Still, my mentor assured me, it was a good idea and there was room to explore and expand on it.

I was fortunate in 2014 to be recruited onto the team at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and we began to explore the possibilities of bone regeneration. I’m excited to say the research and clinic trials we are doing are game-changing, especially for younger people with bone cancer.

Essentially, we are helping the patient’s body heal itself. We trick the body into thinking there’s a fracture, and we can slowly but surely use the fracture healing response to make new bone to seal the gap where the tumor was removed. In this way we can avoid the need for metal implants and help people grow back their own bone. And—most importantly— we can set up a young person for a much better quality of life for a longer period of time than ever before. As of now, Memorial Sloan Kettering is the only place in the U.S. using this limb-lengthening technique, but I hope it won’t be long before others follow suit.

In 2018, I was honored with a Service Excellence Award from Healthnetwork Foundation to support research in the field of bone regeneration in patients affected by bone cancers. Our research focus is to better understand the process of distraction osteogenesis to optimize bone healing for each individual. Those who support Healthnetwork should know this kind of funding is important in getting a project like this started. We often use such funding to hire researchers or grad students, helping launch a project in the early stages; then, we can turn it into much bigger things.

DANIEL E. PRINCE, MD, MPH is a surgeon specializing in orthopedics and musculoskeletal oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He created their bone regeneration team which focuses on limb- and joint-sparing reconstructive techniques to optimize patients’ function and quality of life.

Suicide epidemic driven by despair’s partner — loneliness

Contemporary America’s main problem has been defined by many as “addiction”: addiction to technology, to pain medication, or to the freedom of non-commitment. But these are only symptoms of a deeper root-cause.

The perils of misdiagnosis afflict many patients. An elderly gentleman comes in with stomach pain, only to be sent home with antacid medication and advice to avoid certain foods. After three months of persistent pain, weight loss, and fatigue, he is diagnosed with stage four colon cancer. For this gentleman, and for America, focusing on symptoms over root-cause can prove deadly.

Since the turn of the century, Americans have been suffering “Deaths of Despair” at an unprecedented rate. Suicide is now the second leading cause of death for American teenagers and the tenth leading cause of death for Americans overall. Equally harrowing, drug overdose is the leading cause of death for Americans under the age of fifty.

While the statistics are daunting, the reality is devastating. In every age group, and across every geographic region, mothers are finding themselves childless, husbands are suddenly without a wife, and sisters are left without a brother. Americans are having less sex and fewer children (historically, signs of diminished hope), anger defines politics, and a silent feeling of dissatisfaction permeates American life. Although Americans are materially prosperous, our psychological and spiritual lives are in freefall.

The diagnosis: loneliness.

Just last week a young woman who intentionally severed her airway and spinal cord with an 8-inch kitchen knife saw me in the emergency room. She cited the isolation associated with caring for her ill grandmother, and the paucity of individuals with whom she could meaningfully discuss such challenges, as the drivers of her despair. Unfortunately, patients like her are far too common. Loneliness, like hers, is defined by an absence of meaningful relationships that now plagues 40% of all Americans.

What caused this loneliness? The answer is not as simple as “blame social media.” Technology is both symptom and cause — much like changes in religious participation, family structure, and the economy. The unifying theme, however, is that we no longer live in community.

Compared to 25 years ago, Americans spend half as much time at the dinner table and don’t invite neighbors over nearly as often. Participation in community organizations has plummeted. The resulting lack of connection and “social capital” is proving fatal.

The solution: be present.

Close your computer and engage your colleague while waiting for a meeting to start. Re-define “FaceTime” by opting for a shared coffee over a phone call. Check in on the widow down the street. Acknowledge the power, and importance, of civic involvement. Recognize the sacred space of the home by designating “tech-free” spaces. Reclaim the dinner table. In short, cultivate the virtues of selflessness and sacrifice

This unique American moment asks not for a call to arms, but for a call to neighborliness.

FRANCIE HART BROGHAMMER, MD is the chief psychiatry resident at UC Irvine Medical Center, doing clinical work and research examining the social, relational, and spiritual determinants of mental health. In addition to speaking nationwide on these topics, she serves as an American Psychiatric Association Leadership Fellow and is a member of the UC Irvine Medical Ethics Committee. Francie can be reached atfbrogham@uci.edu.

Recipe for skin cancer: 15 sunny steps

1. Believe, “skin cancer can’t happen to me. I won’t be one of the 10,000 Americans diagnosed daily with skin cancer.” If you apply sunscreen, use the lowest number you can find and apply it like a typical American who puts it on so thin that they achieve only a quarter to half the protection listed on the sunscreen bottle.

2. Remove as much clothing, hats, and glasses as possible when in the sun.

3. Marinate in the sun for your vitamin D, even though half of Hawaiian surfers who spent 29 hours/week in the sun year-round were vitamin D deficient

4. Ignore non-healing sores lasting more than a month – especially on the face.

5. If you wear a hat, use a visor or baseball hat, and stay away from hats with a 2” or wider circumferential brim.

6. Win the ‘lobster-man’ or ‘lobster-woman’ award for the best ‘grimace-inducing sunburn’ at your local Yacht Club – as many years running as possible.

7. Choose parents who will give you fair skin, for as a red-headed, fair-skinned Irish priest patient once said, “The Irish are God’s gift to dermatology.”

8. Repeat, “Skin cancer can’t happen to me. I won’t be in the one-third of Americans who will grow one by the age of 70.”

9. Braise in a tanning bed to acquire the mythical ‘base tan’ that requires killing skin cells to alert other skin cells to make a tan – that provides as much protection as SPF 3 (three!) sunscreen – and don’t forget, the tanning bed rays accelerate skin wrinkles compared to the sun. Wrinkles give your face character.

10. Bake exposed skin in the sun as close to the equator – and to mid-day – as possible.

11. Fertilize and cultivate your garden in the middle of the day. Not only does the sun feed your fruits, vegetables, and flowers, but nothing motivates a skin cancer like sunlight!

12. Appreciate those multi-colored, growing “moles” – after all, they’re just ‘beauty marks,’ and they can’t kill anyone (except 7,200 other people annually in America).

13. Avoid websites like www.skincancer. org that could help you prevent skin cancer or get it diagnosed early.

14. Contribute monthly (and don’t forget to fill out your company matching-gift form) to “MakeAmericaTanAgain.Com.”

If you have already had a skin cancer, follow all of these instructions, because doing these things will reduce your number of future cancers.

15. Stew slowly with the thought, “Skin cancer can’t happen to me”, and believe, ”Skin cancer isn’t a big deal, even if I get it, because Hugh Jackman and Melanie Griffith have proven that you can still be attractive with cancer surgery scars on your nose.”

Put your dermatologist on speed-dial; he/she will want to admire the results of your efforts.

TOM MCGOVERN is a Legate who practices Mohs Surgery full-time at Fort Wayne Dermatology Consultants in Fort Wayne, IN. He co-hosts the Doctor, Doctor radio shows/podcasts for the Catholic Medical Association.

Follow Church prescription for a Catholic living will

Living wills were first introduced by the Euthanasia Society of America in 1967, and were popularized by one of its members, advice columnist Abigail Van Buren (“Dear Abby”). Given the disreputable history of the living will, Catholic patients should ensure that end-of-life documents follow Church teaching. Living wills do not become activated until patients cannot speak personally to express their desires. Health care surrogates, usually family members, need to be assigned to speak for the patients then. A Catholic living will should also address the following 5 principles, to avoid the dangers of secular end-of life documents.

1. Relieving pain. Church teaching strongly supports patients being kept as free of pain as possible. This needs to be balanced with patients’ moral and family duties as they prepare with full consciousness to meet Christ.

2. Assessing treatments as ordinary or extraordinary. Patients and their families need to be given adequate information for a clear understanding of any end-of-life treatment. Is each treatment: 1) serving as a bridge to recovery from an acute medical problem, 2) alleviating suffering from an ongoing condition, or 3) offering little hope of benefit and actually becoming burdensome? There is no obligation to accept extraordinary treatments that have significant risks which may outweigh benefits.

3. Providing food and nutrition. A written request for receiving food and water, even if by artificial means, is generally not included in a standard secular living will that views assisted nutrition and hydration as medical treatment, but the Catholic Church views assisted nutrition and hydration as normal care. Pope St. John Paul II wrote:

“The administration of water and food, even when provided by artificial means, always represents a natural means of preserving life, not a medical act.”

When a terminally ill patient, however, is at the brink of death, body systems are shutting down and can no longer digest food. At this point assisted hydration and nutrition become burdensome and could be discontinued.

4. Prohibiting euthanasia. The immorality of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide (PAS) predates Christianity, as Hippocrates prohibited this practice 2,400 years ago. The Catholic Church has always taught that these are grave violations of God’s law. In an age where PAS is being legalized, it is important to clearly state an opposition to this misguided autonomy and false mercy.

5. Requesting spiritual care. This provision asserts that a priest be notified and that the Sacraments be given. The Sacraments of Penance, Anointing of the Sick, and Viaticum are the healing Sacraments that give peace, strength, and grace in preparation for death. The Anointing of the Sick unites a person more closely to Christ’s Passion and uses suffering as a participation in His saving work.

A Catholic living will that includes these 5 principles — and a designated surrogate committed to Catholic principles to speak when the patient cannot — serves not only the patient’s own well-being, but also acts as a tool for evangelization by witnessing to the truth about human dignity, the redemptive value of suffering, and hope in eternal life. For a model Catholic end-of-life document: https://www. flacathconf.org/documents/2018/11/CDLD.pdf

Dr. PETER MORROW is the immediate past-president of the Catholic Medical Association, and practices geriatric medicine in Saint Cloud, Florida.

Accessing priceless, timely health intervention

Healthnetwork has been a Godsend to our family. My first experience with Healthnetwork was over 10 years ago. While on a family vacation to Egypt, my mother (85) slipped and dislocated her shoulder. She was taken to a local hospital, where they manipulated her shoulder back into place, then immobilized her arm until she could return home to a specialist.

Upon her return, although not in pain, Mom was still unable to move her arm. She consulted two different orthopedic specialists, who both stated that she tore her rotator cuff and needed surgery. She scheduled surgery, but something just did not feel right to me. We were longtime Legatus members, and I thought maybe Healthnetwork could be of help for a third opinion!

Since my mom was already scheduled for surgery, Healthnetwork secured an appointment in just three days with Dr. John Brems at Cleveland Clinic. He spent 45 minutes with my mother, explaining test results and why he felt her rotator cuff damage was age-related, not a result of the fall. He ordered a test which confirmed the auxiliary nerve to the deltoid muscle was damaged. Dr. Brems gave her exercises to remedy her mobility issues; no surgery was required.

Following his advice, Mom gained full use of her arm, rather than partial movement that surgery would have allowed. In my opinion, Healthnetwork saved her months of pain, rehabilitation, and risk of surgical complications. Most of all, it gave her continued quality of life and enabled her to leave a few weeks later for her winter home in Florida.

Four years ago, the shingles virus attacked my brother-in-law Tim’s heart, causing significant heart damage and resulted in him going in and out of AFib five times in those four years. On the fifth episode, Tim was in AFib for six weeks. Because he was frustrated, I asked if he’d like me to try my Healthnetwork connections. Cleveland Clinic offered the top heart specialists in the country.

Tim got an appointment with Dr. Amman Hussein, a specialist in cardiac electrophysiology. After spending 45 minutes reviewing test results with Tim, Dr. Hussein and Tim felt an ablation was the best course of action. Tim just completed his three-month check-up following the procedure. His heart is no longer enlarged, and ejection factor is back to normal. Tim says this is the best he has felt in years, and is grateful for Dr. Hussein.

My husband, Lee, had a triple bypass and two stents by a local cardiologist. He had great respect for his doctor; unfortunately, he was transitioning to a more administrative role, and Lee needed a new specialist. A call to Healthnetwork and we had an appointment. We are very pleased with a specialist in Interventional Cardiology that Cleveland Clinic has recommended. Lee’s appointment is approaching, and we are confident he’ll be in good hands.

I have witnessed two life-changing events facilitated by Healthnetwork. Fellow Legatus members should realize how easy it is to work with Healthnetwork. In my opinion, working through Healthnetwork guarantees a positive experience. We have become GOLD supporters because of the extraordinary care and attention we received from both Healthnetwork and Cleveland Clinic.

DIANE HUSS, (and her husband Lee) from LaSalle, Michigan, are Legates in the Genesis Chapter, as well as Healthnetwork GOLD supporters.