Tag Archives: Detroit Chapter

HealthNetwork came to our rescue like no other

There are so many benefits to being a Legatus member. One that I consider a Godsend is Healthnetwork Foundation. Many years ago, Walter and I became Healthnetwork GOLD supporters, as I thought that it would be a great safety net – an organization we could count on when we needed medical help.

It is scary as you get older and see more friends and family struggle with serious health issues, and the overwhelming indecision they face while trying to grasp their new reality. Where do they go for medical care, how do they get there, and whom do they see? All these decisions need to be made in a very short time, while they try and make sense of a diagnosis.

We are so grateful for Healthnetwork. We know from experience they will provide advice on where the right experts are. And, they will quickly jump into securing appointments with experts when we need them.

I had a heart attack a few years ago in Florida, and Walter called Healthnetwork. Without hesitation, Healthnetwork medical coordinators rallied and made connections on our behalf at Cleveland Clinic (#1 heart center as ranked by US News & World Report). Ultimately, I stayed in Florida for treatment, but we were reassured by the swiftness and compassion shared by our coordinator during a very stressful time.

Another time, our daughter, an anesthesiologist, was very concerned about her baby daughter’s soft spot which had not closed. I knew that we needed to get Healthnetwork involved. She asked for more information about the issue and Healthnetwork’s medical director provided research on the condition. They also identified experts who were available to see our granddaughter. She is now a very busy 12-year-old and a champion swimmer.

Walter and I are blessed with good health. Healthnetwork has proven very resourceful in providing physician referrals during the times we needed them most. We have also asked for help for dear friends. One friend had a serious heart issue. Because of Healthnetwork, he was put under the care of Mayo Clinic and lived another seven-plus years.

There are many more stories of families they have helped. Those who call upon Healthnetwork receive an outstanding level of care. Families have the privacy to explore their options. Healthnetwork offers guidance and connections at a very critical time. Because of our gratitude for the life-changing connections we have seen, we have increased our support levels with Healthnetwork.

We encourage other Legates to reach out to Healthnetwork. They are a phenomenal team whose resources are just what is needed when one is faced with stymying medical issues.

WALTER AND JANET KNYSZ are Legates of the Detroit Chapter

Meet the Chaplain: Concurrent pastor of two parishes also shepherds Detroit Chapter

Monsignor Charles Kosanke, the chaplain of Legatus’ Detroit Chapter, is the pastor of the Motor City’s two oldest operating parishes.

Monsignor Kosanke, 59, who was ordained a priest in December 1985, is also the chairman of Catholic Charities for the Archdiocese of Detroit and a member of the Catholic Biblical Association. He has been a Legatus chaplain for 14 years, and recently spoke with Legatus magazine.

How would you describe your experience as a Legatus chaplain?

I’ve had the opportunity to meet a lot of wonderful, dedicated and generous Catholics who support the Church and many other worthy charities. Our monthly program and speakers not only inspire and inform the members of the chapter, but I experience that same inspiration and knowledge as well.

How did you discern your vocation?

The birth of my vocation was really in my home parish, where my family was very involved, as well as my siblings and me. I was an altar server for many years, which gave me a close-up view of a parish priest. I looked into religious orders like the Capuchins, but I really felt called to be a parish priest in a diocese. So after high school, I entered the seminary. But though I never became a Franciscan, many of my parish assignments have brought me into contact with the poor and suffering.

What is your current assignment?

I’m the pastor of two parishes in Detroit: St. Anne Church, which was founded in 1701 and is the second-oldest operating parish in the United States, and the oldest church in Detroit. I’m also the pastor of Most Holy Trinity Church in Detroit, which is our second oldest parish founded in 1834.

In what ways is it unique for you being pastor of two historical parishes?

These two particular parishes are very special to the city of Detroit, not only for their history, but also for their legacy of service. Most Holy Trinity has one of the few Catholic schools left in the city of Detroit. It also has the longest operating free medical clinic in the country. In fact, Most Holy Trinity Church was the first hospital in Detroit because it was the place where they brought people suffering from the cholera epidemic in 1834. With St. Anne Church, the vision of Archbishop [Allen Henry] Vigneron is for St. Anne’s to become an apostolic center for the diocese, especially in the area of evangelization, with programs and services that would benefit all of the Catholics in Detroit.

How do you balance everything?

Two things are very important to me. One, is to get eight hours of sleep a night. Second, a daily holy hour in the morning. Those two things really keep me physically and spiritually strong, and keep me able to balance my various responsibilities. Plus, the parishes and Catholic Charities have very good staff, so it certainly makes it easier when you’re working with competent and dedicated people.

What do you do in your free time?

In my downtime, there are three things I like to do. I like to read, especially history. I also like to golf and swim.

What are you reading now?

I’m currently reading two books. One is called 1861, which is about the start of the Civil War after the election of Abraham Lincoln. The other is more Detroit-based, called The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Streets. These two books dovetail with one another about that time in history. Also, St. Anne’s was the only place of worship in the city of Detroit for 110 years, so anything that happened in the first 100 years of the city certainly has to do with my parish.

How would you describe your day-today life?

 When it comes down to it, my life is really the Church. It’s not like I’m a priest 40 hours a week and the other time is my own. I’m basically immersed in the Life of the Church, which gives me great joy.