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A wake-up call to evangelize

As we recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, we have much to think and pray about. There has been a lot of talk about the long-term effects of this crisis on our economy, society, and the Church. From a spiritual perspective, the experience of going several months without the ability to attend Mass was something many of us could not have imagined in our lifetime! What will be the impact on Catholics worldwide? For some, they may not come back. On the other hand, this experience could cause faithful Catholics to realize the gift that the Mass and Eucharist are, and be a wake-up call and catalyst to set us on fire to evangelize others.

Tom Monaghan

Several years ago a Pew Research Survey reported that for every new Catholic who entered the Church, we lose six. This is a startling statistic, but let us start with the positive… those entering the Church. I believe it is safe to say that converts to the Faith are often the most on-fire Catholics in the Church. They are typically entering the Church because they are attracted to it, at least enough to know it is the true Faith and comes at a cost – such as having to change their lives and make sacrifices, such as upsetting family members. Yet the fact that they are willing to pay a price is evidence that they appreciate the Church.

I have often said that when it comes to evangelization, one on-fire Catholic is worth many lukewarm Catholics. How many nominal Catholics convince others to convert to Catholicism, if any? On the other hand, many converts who are on fire for Christ are willing to share their Faith with others and thus draw others into the Church. If each new Catholic converted six – our numbers would be the same, but how much more alive the Church would be!

Now in terms of those leaving the Church, we have to conclude that they did not understand what it meant to be Catholic. The same Pew Research Survey mentioned above stated that 13 percent of all Americans describe themselves as “former Catholics,” and that 23 percent of the total population are unaffiliated, or the so-called “nones.” These former Catholics and “nones” are unlikely to step into a Catholic Church unless we give them good reason. If our faith has no meaning, no substance, no hope, no love…why would anyone want to become Catholic? But if we as Catholics are markedly different from our secular counterparts, then we can truly be beacons, ambassadors for Christ and His Church.

As our society comes out of the pandemic, I think we have an opportunity. People do not want to be bound by the fear so prevalent today. Instead, they want to experience love and hope, which we have in the Church. And as I have said on many occasions, Legatus members have more potential than most to share our Faith because we are more visible, influential, and credible.

TOM MONAGHAN is Legatus’ founder, chairman, and CEO.

Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati (1901-1925)

Feast Day: July 4
Beatified: May 20, 1990
Patron Of World Youth Days, Italian Confraternities, Catholic Youth, Mountain Climbers, Skiers, Dominican Tertiaries

Pier Giorgio Frassati, “The Man of the Beatitudes,” was born in 1901 in Turin, Italy to an influential family. From his youth, the handsome and personable Frassati showed a devout nature, attending daily Mass, and joined the Marian Sodality and the Apostleship of Prayer.

An avid outdoorsman, Pier Giorgio organized mountain climbs and hiking trips with friends. He loved theater and was politically active, strongly anti-Fascist, and involved with the Catholic Young Workers Congress.

He became a professed Third Order Dominican, devoted to St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Catherine of Siena. Having a deep love for the poor, he joined the St. Vincent de Paul Society and spent much free time tending to the needy

At just 24, he contracted polio – which some say he got from caring for people in the Turin slums. He suffered six days before dying on July 4, 1925. As a testament to his character, the local poor lined the streets of Turin for his funeral procession. St. Pope John Paul II beatified him on May 20, 1990. Pier Giorgio has been a patron for several World Youth Days.

Conversion to pro-life and the Catholic faith was providentially ‘unplanned’

ABBY JOHNSON, FORMER ABORTION CLINIC DIRECTOR, TO ADDRESS LEGATUS SUMMIT WEST

Most Catholic audiences are familiar with Abby Johnson, the pro-life speaker and author who resigned as director of a Planned Parenthood clinic in 2009 after she witnessed an ultrasound of a 13-week-old baby being aborted.

What people may not know about Johnson, a feisty Texan known for speaking her mind, is that it’s not always easy for her to be “out front” on an issue that generates great controversy in secular society.

“There are times I’ve thought, ‘I don’t want to talk about this right now,’ and I’ve shied away from being bold,” said Johnson, who will be a featured speaker at the 2020 Legatus Summit West, to be held Sept. 17-19 in Colorado Springs, CO.

Johnson, 39, a wife and mother of eight children, will speak about being a strong public witness for Christ and the right to life. Her autobiography about her pro-life conversion, Unplanned, was adapted into a movie last year that grossed $21 million worldwide. She spoke recently with

She spoke recently with Legatus magazine.

What will you speak about at the Legatus Summit West?

 What I really want to talk about is living out our faith in a very public way. The people who are going to be at this conference are leaders in their fields, in their businesses. I think sometimes we worry, when we’re in places of leadership, about being too vocal about our beliefs or our faith, about what people are going to think and who we’re going to offend. I believe we’re in times when we must be very bold about our faith, our beliefs, and about Christ.

 What was it like to see your story onscreen?

I felt very vulnerable. It was definitely difficult to watch the first few times, seeing the worst version of who you were played out on a screen and realizing that millions of people across the world are going to see this as well. I just had to keep remembering why I did this. It wasn’t to make Abby Johnson a household name. It was really to make God’s mercy and his redemption known in every household.

What feedback did you get from people?

I started to hear all these stories of how people’s lives were changed, babies who were saved, people who went from “pro-choice” to pro-life. That’s really what it was all about: showing people the goodness of God, and that anybody can change their mind. Conversion is real.

How well did actress Ashley Bratcher portray you?

She did a good job. Unfortunately, she was cast at the very last minute. We didn’t have any time to spend together before she actually went to the set. She’s not Southern, so maybe there was a little bit of feistiness missing. My friends who watched the film said, “Oh, she was way too nice.” I wish we could have had some time together, but given the circumstances and the quick turnaround of casting, I think she did a great job.

What led you and your husband to enter the Catholic Church in 2012?

When I left Planned Parenthood, I left all of my friends and support network behind. All my new friends happened to be Catholic. My husband and I were raised with a covert antiCatholicism. We were against it, but our friends kept bothering us. So we went to Mass one Sunday, and we walked out thinking, “Huh. There’s something there we want to know more about.” As soon as we told our friends that, we found ourselves in RCIA, and all these questions Doug and I had our whole lives started being answered. Little by little, that’s where we found the Truth.

Pushing through today’s ‘red-light-green-light’ business jam

Business was great. The economy was humming. Sales were at all-time highs. Then the pandemic hit.

“Our business pretty much dropped 80 percent across the board,” said Dave Anderson, president of Brand RPM, a Charlotte-based company that produces apparel and merchandise for corporations and athletic teams. 

In late March, most of the nation’s governors issued stay-at-home orders, and mandated all businesses deemed “nonessential” to shut down in an attempt to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, which by early June had already killed more than 110,000 Americans.

The shutdowns and social-distancing protocols arguably saved lives and prevented numerous hospital intensive care units from being overrun with COVID-19 patients. But those measures have come at a steep cost. 

More than 21 million people in the United States were still out of work in early June. The national unemployment rose to about 13 percent by late May, a figure not seen since the Great Depression of the 1930s. The country has been officially in recession – since February – and businesses are struggling. Some may not recover.

While weathering the economic storm, some business leaders have deftly adapted their companies to the new reality, repositioning their organizations for growth and charting new paths for a post-pandemic future. Legatus magazine spoke with two Legates who lead companies, one small and one large, to see how the pandemic has changed those businesses, both in the short-term and over the long haul.

Furloughs, pay cuts, new offerings

 Anderson, the president of Legatus’ Charlotte Chapter, said the first three months of 2020 were “the biggest months” ever for his company of 110 full-time staff employees. But as the pandemic hit the United States in earnest, Anderson knew he had to act quickly.

 “The first thing we did was furlough 10 percent of our staff,” said Anderson, who added that everyone else in the company took a 50-percent pay cut. Those moves helped to prevent layoffs.

 Anderson and his team also examined their cash flow and consulted computer models to see what they could expect with the virus-ravaged economy over the next six to nine months.

 “As a small business, if you don’t have cash, you’re out of business,” Anderson said.

 Brand RPM pivoted from its core apparel and branded merchandise business to becoming a large provider of personal protective equipment – face coverings, hand sanitizers, gloves, and disinfectant wipes – to companies such as Lowe’s, which purchased two million masks in April.

 “Funny enough, we had our largest revenue month in our company’s entire 12-year history in April,” Anderson said. “And probably 90 percent of it, I never touched; I just droppedshipped masks from the suppliers to the customers.” 

Anderson said Brand RPM is looking to be a reliable source of “PPE” for companies as they reopen across the country amid their states’ loosening restrictions. Anderson expects the demand for masks, hand sanitizers, and gloves to be steady over the next year to 18 months.

 “We think our overall numbers for the second half of the year won’t be what they were in the past, but we hope that with the pivot to PPE, it’ll help us make up some of the lost ground,” said Anderson, who has already started to bring back some of the furloughed staff employees full time.

 Working from home … works

 One lasting effect that Anderson expects the pandemic to have will be more companies such as Brand RPM encouraging their employees to work from home.

“We were already doing teleconferencing and videoconferencing,” Anderson said. “I think that will be a more common theme moving forward as more companies see that working from home really works.”

By mid-October, Anderson hopes his company will have regained its equilibrium, though he added that “everything is a moving target.”

In the meantime, he has found a valuable resource in his fellow Legates and other CEOs with whom he can bounce off ideas and ask questions. 

“We’re all in this together,” Anderson said.

 From millions monthly, to zero

Pat Molyneaux grew his fourth-generation family flooring business, Molyneaux, into a thriving enterprise with 12 locations in Pennsylvania. But within a week of his state shutting down from coronavirus, Molyneaux suddenly had to lay off 95 percent of his employees.

“We went from making close to $2 million a month in revenue to zero,” said Molyneaux, a founding member of Legatus’ Pittsburgh Chapter.

“We grew this business in my 30 years here… and overnight it’s taken away,” Molyneaux said.

But that reality sparked a conversion of sorts as Molyneaux began to see that he had made the family business into an idol. Having a strong balance sheet and a successful enterprise had become the most important things in his life.

 For Molyneaux, that epiphany cast the first ten verses of 2 Corinthians 12 into sharper focus. In those verses, St. Paul speaks of being given a thorn in the flesh to keep him humble, and how God’s power is made perfect in someone’s weaknesses.

 “For a co-owner and member of the executive team, that is the verse for these times,” Molyneaux said. “Whether it’s as a pastor, a bishop, or whether it’s as a C-level executive, how can we become both strong and weak?”

 Molyneaux identifies strength as having the capacity for meaningful impact, and weakness as vulnerability.

 Grace makes business stronger

“After I repented and hit that point of deeper conversion,” Molyneaux said, “I feel like the Lord was opening my mind and giving me the grace of more creativity around what we needed to do to use this opportunity to make the business stronger. I feel like that was a grace.” 

Molyneaux said his company has started to change its primary business model from showrooms in brick-and mortar buildings to a “shop from home” approach where a design consultant visits the customer at home. 

“That’s the way the industry is going. People want that convenience. Most of our shopat-home appointments are through the roof this month,” said Molyneaux, who added that in-store appointments were already on the decline but that the pandemic accelerated that trend. 

Molyneaux said this year also provided an opportunity for his company to move into kitchen remodeling. Those changes may not have been possible before quarantines and social distancing forced him to reexamine his approach to business.

“As human beings, idol worship is a real temptation,” Molyneaux said. “I think often our businesses, what we accumulate through our businesses, can become idols. The rhythms and processes of work can become idols. This gave us a chance to expose those idols.”

 BRIAN FRAGA is a Legatus magazine staff writer.

Cancer diagnosis inspires walk on the Camino

For some people, a cancer diagnosis feels like the end. For Leslie, it was a chance to make a difference while funding research to help others.

Leslie Yerger had gone for a routine annual checkup. Now, just 55 years old and feeling completely normal, she was told something looked abnormal in her baseline bone density scan. That led to more tests, more specialists, and a bone biopsy. She learned she had breast cancer that had metastasized to her bones. Stage IV.

Healthnetwork connected her to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion, and her diagnosis was confirmed.

Leslie returned to Mayo Clinic for a customized plan and worked with Dr. Deborah Rhodes, who said something Leslie will never forget: “You are the woman I’ve dedicated the last ten years of my career to.”

One of the most confusing things for Leslie was that her diagnosis came soon after an “all clear” mammogram and ultrasound. Leslie then had thought that at least she “knew” she didn’t have breast cancer.

Unfortunately, Mayo Clinic physicians found a breast tumor the size of an egg.

For women with dense breast tissue, there’s less than a 50 percent chance that a mammogram will find a tumor. That’s because tumors and dense breast tissue both appear white on a mammogram.

Rhodes helped develop a new method, Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI), which is far more effective at detecting tumors in women with dense breasts than standard mammography alone. The MBI unit is now FDA approved and commercially available, and all Mayo Clinic locations use them as standard supplemental screening for women with dense breasts. However, MBI is not yet widely available.

In 2018, Leslie embarked on the Frances Way, a 500- mile segment of the ancient spiritual passage in Europe called the Camino de Santiago. [Legatus will host its own El Camino Pilgrimage in April 2021.]

She walked, she said, because “I needed to reckon with not knowing the future.” But mostly she walked for the 40,000 women who die from breast cancer annually in the U.S.

Leslie kept a blog while walking the Camino. On October 1, the start of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, she wrote: “My real why [for walking] is about kids without moms, grandkids without grandmas, and widowers without wives. It’s about careers unfinished, potentials not met, and dreams not realized.”

Through private donations and a matching grant, Leslie raised more than $105,000 to support Density MATTERS, Mayo Clinic’s multisite trial headed by Rhodes and her team.

“Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) needs to be available to more women with dense breast tissue, so that more cancers can be found earlier, when they are at the curable stage,” she says. “This was something I could do that would help other women, if only in a small way.”

KATE MARTIN is director of marketing for Healthnetwork. She has worked within the company since 2003, formerly as writer and medical coordinator.

America on Trial: A Defense of the Founding

Robert R. Reilly
Ignatius Press, 366 pages

 

It is claimed that Enlightenment thinkers like John Locke, Charles Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau and the theories of government “by the people” that they developed profoundly influenced the framers of the U.S. Constitution and its Bill of Rights. Robert R. Reilly not only denies this assertion, but turns it on its head. In fact, he traces the American concept of ordered liberty to the Judeo-Christian ideal of one God who creates man in His own image, to the ancient philosophers and their use of reason, and to the Person of Christ Himself. From this they drew the principles of natural law that were the real foundation of our nation, where freedom and reason must together prevail.

 

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COVID vaccines raise worry over life and liberty protection

As Independence Day arrives in this year of the coronavirus, we begin to taste again the basic freedom of personal interaction with friends, family, colleagues, and with our Blessed Lord in the Most Holy Eucharist. Yet as public health restrictions are cautiously eased, a question of life and liberty looms on the horizon: the COVID-19 vaccination.

We should certainly welcome rapid and widespread access to an adequately tested, safe, and effective vaccine, but it is easier said than done. Some major ethical concerns include the use of abortion-derived human fetal cell lines in development, restrictions on proper consent, and disproportionate government intervention.

Abortion-derived human fetal cell lines should not be used in the production of any vaccine. The Catholic Church affirmed this in the instruction Dignitas Personae. Only a handful of the COVID-19 vaccines in development make use of these lines, so there is a hope that a morally sound candidate will be successful. Regardless, we are called to give witness to the dignity of human life by demanding that new vaccines have no ties to abortion.

At the same time, Dignitas personae clarifies that end users are permitted to seek and receive immunizations of immoral origin when there are gravely proportionate reasons — including serious risks to personal or public health — with no better alternative available. Some may refuse vaccination to give special witness to the dignity of unborn children, while others at high risk might opt to safeguard personal and community health by pursuing vaccination.

Origins aside, vaccination decisions demand consideration of the facts to make an informed judgment. With any treatment, a person has the right to know the expected benefits and burdens. Will the vaccine have an effectiveness rate of 80 percent or 25 percent? How extensive was the testing to rule out adverse side effects? Population health benefits do not automatically create obligations for individuals. The decisions remain personal, accounting for circumstances. Risks, including possible adverse side effects, must not be obscured.

A concern with fast-tracked vaccines is the reliability of information concerning effectiveness and risks, the very facts essential to informed consent. Experimental vaccines for coronaviruses in years past have never been approved; a COVID-19 vaccine would be a first for this whole family of viruses. Efforts by health care professionals, pharmaceutical companies, government, and media to push the vaccine by ignoring or vilifying those with reasonable misgivings will weaken an already-waning public trust in vaccination practices. Integrity and transparency about the methods, quality, and conclusions of the research are crucial. This includes clear admissions of what we simply do not know, identification of expected benefits and risks, discussion of the certitude of expectations, and respect for individual judgments.

Government overreach is another major ethical issue. The principle of subsidiarity is a fundamental precept of Catholic social teaching: matters should be handled at the most local level possible, with higher levels offering supportive intervention only when truly necessary. Given the varied ways COVID-19 impacts different regions, a vaccine mandate from federal or state governments would be too blunt an instrument. This would feed a lack of public trust. In a similar vein, proposals for contact tracing or vaccination “chips” raise profound privacy concerns, further erode public trust, and can even sow mistrust within communities.

Government has a rightful interest in protecting the public from widespread and serious illness. Yet when it comes to concrete vaccination decisions, human dignity demands witness to the value of life, provision of adequate and reliable information, freedom of conscience, protection of privacy, and prioritization of more local government over higher levels. Anything less jeopardizes life and liberty.

JOHN A. DiCAMILLO, PH.D., B e.L., is a staff ethicist at The National Catholic Bioethics Center in Philadelphia. He earned his graduate degrees at the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum in Rome. He lives in Lancaster County, PA, with his lovely wife Serena and their children.

The Contagious Catholic: The Art of Practical Evangelization

Marcel LeJeune
Ascension Press, 191 pages

 

Cleverly titled for a time of pandemic, this book by the founder of Catholic Missionary Disciples strives to train Catholics in the strategies and self-confidence necessary to share their faith effectively. Here he examines the example of Jesus, discusses the pathway to discipleship, suggests the kinds of questions that we might ask to open doors to evangelizing, what conversion really means, and how to share our own faith stories in various social situations. He also covers the importance of spiritual mentorship and some of the obstacles that holds Catholics back from success. It’s not a difficult read, but it is an important one if we are to step up in our God-given mission to spread the Gospel.

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Nod to pandemic advances modern Christian persecution

On May 8, 2020, a document titled Appeal for the Church and the World: to Catholics and all people of good will was published [which this author signed]. Its initial signatories included, among others, three cardinals, nine bishops, 11 doctors, 22 journalists, and 13 lawyers. It is astonishing to see how representatives of the ecclesiastical as well as political and media establishment have, in obeisance to the prevailing uniform thinking, unanimously sought to discredit the concerns expressed in the Appeal and squelch any further discussion with the “knock-out argument” that it is mere “conspiracy theory.” I remember a similar form of reaction and language under the Soviet dictatorship, when dissenters and critics of the prevailing ideology and politics were accused of being complicit in the “conspiracy theory” disseminated by the capitalist West.

The critics of the Appeal refuse to consider the evidence, such as the official mortality rate (for the same time period) of the 2017–2018 flu season, as compared with the current COVID-19 epidemic in Germany. The mortality rate of the latter is much lower. There are countries with moderate coronavirus security and prevention measures that, due to their implementation, do not have a higher mortality rate. If the mere acknowledgment of the facts, and discussion about them, is labeled as “conspiracy theory,” then anyone who still thinks independently has good reason to be concerned about the possibility that subtle forms of dictatorship exist in our society. As is well known, eliminating or discrediting societal debate and dissenting voices is a chief characteristic of a totalitarian regime, whose main weapon against dissidents are not factual arguments, but rather demagogic and popular rhetoric. Only dictatorships fear objective debate when there are differing opinions.

The Appeal does not deny the existence of an epidemic and the need to fight it. However, some of the security and prevention measures involve imposing forms of complete surveillance over people. Under the pretext of an epidemic, such measures violate fundamental civil liberties and the democratic order of the State. Proposals regarding compulsory vaccination, with no alternative to the state-approved vaccine, and which would inevitably restrict personal liberties, are also very dangerous. Such measures and proposals are accustoming citizens to forms of technocratic and centrally directed tyranny — and civic courage, independent thinking, and, above all, any resistance, are being severely paralyzed.

One aspect of the security and prevention measures that have been similarly implemented in almost all countries is the drastic ban on public worship. Such bans have existed only in times of systematic Christian persecution. The absolute novelty, however, is that in some places, State authorities are even prescribing liturgical norms to the Church, such as the manner of distributing Holy Communion. This is a clear interference in matters that pertain to the immediate authority of the Church. History will one day lament the “regime-clerics” of our time who subserviently accepted such interference by the State. History has always lamented that, in times of great crisis, the majority remained silent, and dissenting voices were stifled. Therefore, the Appeal for the Church and the World should at least be given a fair chance to initiate an honest debate, without fear of social and moral reprisals, as befits a democratic society

May 13, 2020 + Athanasius Schneider, auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Saint Mary in Astana, Kazakhstan This piece, written by Bishop Athanasius Schneider, appeared originally in the German Catholic newspaper Die Tagespost in May 2020.

When Louisiana’s Highway 1 was the pathway to paradise

By the last day of school, we were well on our way with plans for our summer vacation. Freedom rang while swinging from willow branches into the cool waters of the Mississippi. We fished from the sandbar, captured crawfish behind Mamere’s, and caught river shrimp during the June Rise, the second annual flood of the spring.

By mid-July, however, we were restless. That’s when Daddy packed all eight of us into his 1949 Chevrolet Coupe for a vacation at Grand Isle – a sportsman’s paradise! We were joined by most of our extended family and a few of Daddy’s coworkers. 

We followed Highway 1 — mostly gravel then — from Bayou Lafourche, LA to the Gulf of Mexico. After hours of traveling, we pulled into the Shady Rest Apartments, where the boys and men stayed in one house while the women, girls, and babies stayed in another. To us, the Shady Rest was like Buckingham Palace. There were several wood-paneled rooms with mismatched furniture and one wall-mounted window fan that blew air for 25 cents an hour. We were in the lap of luxury!

No sooner had we arrived than the boys darted to the beach for a swim. After an hour or so, the men arrived with dogwood crabbing poles, scoop nets, and bait. We brought beef tripe (the bait) with us that had been purchased from either Chiquet’s Meat Market in St. James or ordered from “Chewing Gum” Poirrier’s mobile butcher shop. We tied the bait to the crab line, carefully spacing the meat 3 feet apart. Then we took turns walking the line with the scoop net and collecting those blue jewels of the gulf in wooden hampers.

The great thing about the apartments was the outdoor screened houses, where fresh-caught seafood was cleaned and prepared. The crabs were rinsed of sand, then tossed into the boiling water that had been seasoned with the pungent aromas of Zatarain’s Crab Boil, freshcut lemons, and onions. After what seemed an eternity, the boiled crabs, corn, and potatoes were poured onto the outdoor tables that were spread with past issues of New Orleans’ Times-Picayune.

Grand Isle vacations were a family ritual that always included Sunday Mass at Our Lady of the Isle Catholic Church. They were wonderfully predictable until the year my sister, Ruth, brought a few girlfriends along, creating a whole new level of excitement. My brothers and I fought to teach the girls to crab. We offered them the best bait in the bucket. Our chivalry knew no end. We even offered “our guests” the fullest crabs at the evening boil. Of all our years at Grand Isle, that particular summer truly was paradise!

CHEF JOHN D. FOLSE is an entrepreneur with interests ranging from restaurant development to food manufacturing, catering to culinary education. A cradle Catholic, he supports many Catholic organizations including the Sister Dulce Ministry at Cypress Springs Mercedarian Prayer Center in Baton Rouge, LA.

MICHAELA D. YORK is vice president of communications for John Folse & Company.


OVEN-BAKED GARLIC CRABS

Prep Time: 1 Hour • Yield: 4-6 Servings

Comment:

This crab recipe calls for many cloves of garlic. Once the garlic has been sautéed in the butter sauce and baked with the crabs, it becomes quite sweet. The garlic can then be spread on French bread and dipped in the butter sauce from the baking pan. Delicious!

Ingredients:

1 dozen crabs, cleaned
40 cloves garlic, sliced

1 pound melted butter
1 cup olive oil
¼ cup diced onion
¼ cup diced celery
¼ cup diced red bell pepper
¼ cup sliced green onions
¼ cup chopped parsley
2 bay leaves
Worcestershire sauce to taste
Louisiana hot sauce to taste
Salt and cracked black pepper to taste

Method:

Preheat oven to 400°F. In a large sauté pan, melt butter over medium-high heat. Pour in olive oil to prevent butter from burning. Add sliced garlic, onion, celery, bell pepper, green onions, parsley, and bay leaves. Stir constantly to prevent garlic from scorching (over-browned garlic will taste bitter). Season to taste with Worcestershire, hot sauce, salt, and pepper.

Place crabs in a large casserole dish with a one-to two-inch lip and cover with garlic butter mixture. Bake 15-20 minutes, remove from oven, and serve warm with hot French bread.